In the Scottish highlands, a group of thrill seeking climbers stumble cross a little girl buried alive with only a breathing tube for comfort, is for me, a fantastic premise to set an action thriller. So going into A Lonely Place to Die, I was certainly expecting something special, especially considering its film festival success.

Within minutes I had already ciphered why film festivals lapped it up. Shot beautifully with expansive wide-ranging pictures of the scenic Scottish countryside. As rock faces and cliff tops, woods and hills were all used perfectly to introduce the film, but the storyline to follow just didn’t suffice.

…the plot was rushed, as if it had somewhere better to be.

Despite having a largely unknown cast, I felt they all did rather well to bring their characters to life. The problem however was that we simply weren’t given enough time to grow attached to them; before you know it the lead characters are dwindling and without this attachment, as a viewer it’s hard to care.

This problem emerged throughout the film, as the plot was rushed, as if it had somewhere better to be. No more so than in the ending where a viable storyline implodes to utter absurdity by which point the characters you have little care for anyway become parodies of themselves.

…excellent cinematography, a marvellous initial plot and moments of real tension…

With excellent cinematography, a marvellous initial plot and moments of real tension, A Lonely Place to Die shouldn’t be lost in the Scottish Highlands, but with its failure to reach early potential, if it were, few would risk climbing up to get it.

2 Stars

 

About The Author

A philosophy graduate with a love for film.

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