Earlier this year we saw the release of the third Simon Pegg/Nick Frost movie collaboration, The World’s End.

Overall, the film got mixed reviews, but there was one finite positive to take from the film: Nick Frost’s performance. He gave a solid performance as the troubled spirit, who had to put up with the socially inept character that Pegg portrayed. So it then begs the question of why, just why, does he choose to go ahead and work on a film that is so obviously by-the-numbers, that all his credibility will drop once again?

Cuban Fury is the story of Bruce Garrett (Frost) a once promising salsa prodigy, who lives a humdrum life, working in an office. He is overweight, unloved, and constantly under scrutiny from his colleague played by Chris O’Dowd. Cue Rashida Jones, their new boss and the first clue to Bruce that his life needs to change. But how can he connect with someone as beautiful as she? Wait don’t tell me she’s interested in salsa dancing, too. No! Well isn’t that a happy coincidence? And so on, and so forth with this overly cliché, uninspiring comedy, where jokes about shaving one’s balls and getting kicked in the balls are common practice. Sigh. Weep. Snore.

…then shoot yourself to avoid the depressing realisation of the ineptitude of modern British comedies…

In all seriousness, you could put Cuban Fury next to One Chance (the Paul Potts film, remember), compare all of the characters, story elements, and underlying message, and then shoot yourself to avoid the depressing realisation of the ineptitude of modern British comedies.

Cuban Fury is released on February 14th, 2014, just in time for Valentine’s day. So, if you are looking to treat a loved one and take them to a film where the comedy is high and the romance is through the roof… Stay at home and stick on that Notting Hill DVD; Lord knows it will be both cheaper and more entertaining.

 

 

About The Author

Ravensbourne University graduate in Scriptwriting, and a film enthusiast. At my happiest when watching a good movie, reading a good book, or playing the beautiful game of rugby.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.