Human Rights Watch revealed  that Benghazi’s troops are also committing abuses against the Libyan population. According to the HRW, Western, rebel-held areas of Libya are witnessing looting and arson – and supporters of the regime are being persecuted. Spanish newspaper, La Razón, continues with the justification of a rebel officer, who states that the victims were those who worked with the Libyan Army.

The saying “reaping the hurricane” springs to mind. Though individual rights, such as to life, liberty and property are universal and inviolable, one can’t insist on such inviolability when one’s past actions show a belief in the contrary. Those who aided Gaddafi’s thugs can hardly complain about persecution. Nevertheless, this makes for a poor justification at best.

…these crimes beg the question: does this hint at a wider violent trend in the rebels we are not yet aware of?

Ultimately, this is sadly not a case of justice being served, no matter how rough. Hospitals and medical centres in towns like Rayayinah and Al Awaniya were also looted and vandalised by rebels, alleges HRW. Though difficult to sympathise with those which supported Gaddafi’s henchmen, or else his totalitarian intentions, one can scarcely justify ransacking hospitals. Further, these crimes beg the question: does this hint at a wider violent trend in the rebels we are not yet aware of?

Simply put, this news confirms what was already known about the Libyan debacle: NATO and the West have thrown in their lot with a pack of amateurs.

Amidst news of increasingly brutal Syrian crackdowns and the intervention’s cost – some bombs dropped costing €80,000 each – one wonders: why Libya?

These amateurs, too disorganised to stop their troops sacking hospitals, too inept to make headway despite overwhelming air support, too amorphous to present a meaningful alternative to Gaddafi, are the keystones of our hopes for Libya. Amidst news of increasingly brutal Syrian crackdowns and the intervention’s cost – some bombs dropped costing €80,000 each – one wonders: why Libya?

The Syrian dictatorship’s complicity in Islamic terrorism is an open secret. The Council on Foreign Relations notes Syria’s long-term support for Hezbollah in attacks on Israel; it is known to play host to an external headquarters of Hamas; a Congressional Research Service Report highlights the increasing integration of Syrian-Iranian military systems, confirming its role as the “long arm” of Iran in the region. Together, these issues amply illustrate the threat posed to regional stability – and our security – due to the likes of President Assad. In light of this; of Assad’s continued brutality, and the questionable motives, efficacy and (now) morality of our Libyan rebel ‘friends,’ again, one wonders: why Libya?

About The Author

As a student of War Studies and History at King's College London, politics and key events – both past and current – have always fascinated me. Inspired to engage with political ideas by my interest in foreign languages and cultures, I seek to approach and analyse current affairs with a distinct and challenging perspective.

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