Part 2 of what’s going down in the Tennis world…

What adds more uncertainty in the Women’s singles will be the crop of players underneath the aforementioned group who are rallying (pun intended) to break through and cement their status as future Grand Slam champions. Players to look out for range from Wimbledon Champion Kvitova, whose star has risen and the onus will be on her to keep the momentum going. Marion Bartoli has been a prominent figure in the last few years with only a semi-final to show for her work this year. Sabine Lisicki will be hoping to prove she’s more than a flash in the plan and Victoria Azarenka will want to take her progress a step further having lost to eventual Grand Slam winners Li Na (French Open) and Clijsters (Australian) already this year.

All these players will want to be christened champion come the end of these two weeks with the US Open holding as much significance (if not heritage) as a tournament such as Wimbledon. Second only to Wimbledon in terms of its age (1881 to 1877), the tournament has played a role in determining the face of tennis today. Tie breaks were first introduced at the end of a set in a Grand slam tournament in 1970, seeding was first introduced in 1927 and in terms of race equality Althea Gibson was the first black woman to compete at any Grand Slam event.

…the US Open remains one that fails to grab the attention of the public…

 For whatever reason despite the promotion of the event in this country, the US Open remains one that fails to grab the attention of the public beyond the involvement of a British player. While Wimbledon remains home for the public for many obvious reasons, unlike other sports that bring with them a sizeable audience when they go overseas (football, rugby), the US Open (much like the Australian and French Open) doesn’t bring with it the same interest. Perhaps if a certain Scotsman can reach the final and win it, interest in this tournament will be ignited.

Image courtesy of The US Open 2011 and Althea Gibson

 

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